Something Fishy

Written by Scott Joseph on .

Fishy int

Naming restaurants is hard work. Unless you go for the obvious and default to something like Joe's Diner, it's difficult to come up with something clever, catchy and memorable that also conveys the concept. Hawkers is one that clicks on all levels. On the other hand, just about any restaurant with a number in its name is a head scratcher. I know there's a Tex-Mex restaurant in Winter Park called Cocina something or other, but I can never remember the number part of the name. It's the area code for Dallas, which would count as clever for a Tex-Mex restaurant, but memorable? No.

Like I said, it's hard work.

So what to make of Something Fishy, a seafood restaurant in Apopka? Clever? Sort of. Memorable? Yes, it is. Advisable? Ehhhhh. Should the Black Bean Deli rename itself the Musical Fruit Cafe?

Bates New England Seafood & Steakhouse

Written by Scott Joseph on .

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I drove out to Ocoee the other day and found myself back in 1988.

Well, not really, but as I had dinner at Bates New England Seafood & Steakhouse, I couldn't help thinking of when Boston's Fish House opened in Winter Park. That was when good seafood restaurants were hard to come by in Central Florida, which is odd to think of today considering we're essentially surrounded by seawater.

It's even odder that one of the best new seafood restaurants in town was flying its fish in from New England.

So does Bates. And just like Boston's before it, it features New England specialities like Ipswich or whole belly clams and seafood platters of breaded and deep-fried fish, shrimp, scallops and other things from the sea.

And it's all done very well.

Progressive Dinner at Swan & Dolphin's Kimonos, Il Mulino and bluezoo

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Progressive Dinner at Walt Disney Swan Dolphin

I had a fun time recently taking part in a progressive dinner of sorts that had me and some other media members visiting the premium restaurants at Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin Resort. We had been invited by the two hotels' PR team as a way of reacquainting ourselves with some restaurants we may not have visited in a while.

It had been a long while since I had been in Kimonos, the elegant sushi bar in the Swan where we started our evening. In fact, it occurred to me that the last time I did a full review of Kimonos I liked the food but I took management to task for not offering a nonsmoking section.

LemonShark Poke

Written by Scott Joseph on .

lemonshark exterior

Sometimes when a food fad starts trending, we scratch our heads in befuddlement of what all the fuss is about. (I'm looking at you, cupcakes.)

But occasionally, you'll happen upon someone who is doing the current food a la mode in such a way as to produce an aha moment, where you say, "OK, now I get it."

If you've been wondering about the surge in restaurants offering the Hawaiian raw fish bowls, your eureka! is waiting for you at LemonShark Poke on Restaurant Row.

Big Kahuna's Island Style Bowls

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Big Kahuna bowl

Things started out really well at Big Kahuna’s Island Style Bowls. And let me hasten to say that things ended nicely, too.

The middle part was frustrating.

Let’s start with the beginning. I entered the small storefront on Tuskawilla Road and was greeted by a man sitting in a large comfy chair just inside the front door. I’ll assume he was the owner — Mr. Kahuna, perhaps — and I thought is was nice that he said hello — if he had wanted to he could have pretended to just be another customer.

And I was also greeted quite genuinely by a young man behind the counter, who bade me welcome and said something along the lines of, “What can I start building for you today?”

That’s when things started to get frustrating.

Da Kine Poke

Written by Scott Joseph on .

Dakine counter

It only took me a year, but I finally tried Da Kine Poke, another food business that started as a food truck and then became mostly nonmobile. It celebrated its anniversary this week.

They’ve taken over part of the Meat House in Winter Park. Or maybe it’s the Local Butcher and Market. It’s a little confusing. The Meat House is a franchise butcherie that opened in Winter Park in 2011. Then some locals announced they were buying the business and changing the name to the Local.

That was in October. Of 2015.

It still says the Meat House on the outside of the building, but my receipt read “the Local.” So who knows?

But Da Kine Poke is still Da Kine Poke.

Reel Fish Coastal Kitchen + Bar

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Reelfish exterior

When the owners of the Ravenous Pig announced, in October, that they would be moving the popular restaurant up the road, the original space was immediately snatched up by Fred Thimm for a new concept, Reel Fish Coastal Kitchen + Bar. That restaurant opened in February.

Thimm, former vice president and chief operating officer of Hard Rock International, said when we spoke in October that he had always been in love with coastal cuisine and that his intention was to create a coastal kitchen in an inland setting.

The idea was to create “a contemporary version of a classic fish camp,” which, the restaurant’s website explains, were simple, rustic eateries established during the Depression to provide workers and families “fuss-free fresh fish” (a phrase I will not attempt to utter when this review airs on WMFE-90.7).

Capsized Kitchen

Written by Scott Joseph on .

Capsized sign

Sometimes you find little gems in the oddest of places. And you won’t find too many places for a small take-out eatery than this one. It’s Capsized Kitchen, a small seafood-centric restaurant, tucked in a corner of a Sunoco gas station.

Let’s pause here while everyone gets the gas and grease jokes out of the way. Ready?

But there it is, past the shelves of the convenience store part of the station, a corner of the small structure with a professional grade kitchen operated, apparently, by a staff of two. As far as I could figure out, one is the main cook and the other helps out and takes the orders. Sometimes helping out takes precedence over taking orders.

Paddlefish

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Paddlefish exterior

Finally made it in to Paddlefish for a proper, sit-down dinner. I had visited previously for a media event, but that was a walkabout affair that served food but didn’t allow one to experience it as a restaurant. I’m happy to report that Paddlefish, with a culinary team led by chef Mark Boor, offers a very nice dining opportunity and is a good addition to the growing list of Disney Springs venues.

Paddlefish, of course, is the reimagined Fulton’s Crab House (née Empress Lily), on the nonfloating structure made to resemble a vintage paddlewheel river boat.

It’s less vintage-y with the recent renovation, which gave it a modern look, both inside and out (though the frozen-in-place paddles remain).

This is a huge facility, but it features several smaller dining rooms that keep it from feeling like a large main feeding room on a cruise ship.

Urban Tide 2017

Written by Scott Joseph on .

 Urbantide dining room

I enjoyed going back recently to Urban Tide, the very good seafood centric restaurant at Hyatt Regency Orlando. The reason for the visit was ostensibly to sample one of the dishes that will be served at this year’s Heart of Florida United Way’s Chefs Gala, which is earlier than usual, Feb. 4.

But I also wanted the chance to see how the restaurant was doing these days because the hotel has rejoined the SJO family. And you all know my policy.

I can’t tell you that Urban Tide is as good as it was in the past. I think it has gotten even better.

The food that chef Jared Gross served on my visit was top notch.