Editor's note: Today's wine column is by Erin Allport of Wine on the Way, an SJO advertiser. Wine on the Way is offering a special discount through Easter for SJO readers who order online with a special code. The code is SJO10; enter it when you "view my cart" before checking out.
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ph logoPatz & Hall Vineyards began in 1988 with the purpose of making exceptional small-lot and single-vineyard wines. And, for the last 25 years they have not only maintained that commitment but they have also remained relevant. A lot of wineries have their moment and then seem to fade, this is not the case with Patz & Hall. I think one of the main reasons is the dedication of the people who represent their wines. Augustan Wine Imports – a division of Premier Beverage Company – has some of the most dedicated and knowledgeable sales people in the market, you add that with the fact that owner Donald Patz travels to the different markets around the world and is very accessible through social media and you can see why these wines have never seemed to lose their momentum.

They focus exclusively on chardonnay and pinot noir from some of the most sought after California vineyards at a fraction of the price you would pay from other wineries. How do they do it when others seem to charge a fortune for the same grapes? They have cultivated long-lasting relationships from storied vineyards in Napa Valley, Russian River Valley, Mendocino County, Sonoma Coast and Santa Lucia Highlands that make up these great wines.

Donald was asked at a conference what makes a great wine. Here's his nine characteristics:

From the "News That Will Suprise No One" files comes word that Olv, the oddly named restaurant in the SoDo (read: SuperTarget) complex has apparently closed. I say apparently because there is no official statement attached to the darkened door, but the phone is not working and, like I said, it's dark inside. Comments on its Facebook page dating back a week ask for clarification on hours and whether the restaurant is still open.

This is the second closing for Olv. As I reported in October, it closed suddenly, only to reopen in December. About a month ago, I stopped my the restaurant to see how it was doing in its second go-round. I stood waiting at the bar area for someone to greet and seat me. After several minutes of waiting, I simply left.

Shantell ext

If you were to just show up at somebody's house and ask to be fed, you probably wouldn't be surprised to be made to wait while something was thrown together for you. Even if you showed up during what might be considered a normal meal time, you might have to cool your heels while your friend found something to cook for you. Assuming you pulled this stunt at a friend's house and not a strangers, because then you might find yourself arrested.

Even if you were to show up at a restaurant on an off hour you may experience a longer than ideal wait time. Kitchens tend to put foods away and break down service stations. If guests come in before or after that process, it may take a while to get things resituated.

But when you show up at a restaurant at 1 p.m., which to most people is still the heart of lunchtime, you sort of expect more prompt service. Especially when only two other tables — a total of three people — are occupied and waiting for food.

I waited over 45 minutes for my food to arrive at Shantell's Cafe, a well-regarded restaurant in Sanford that recently moved to a new location not far from its original home. It's not like I ordered something out of the ordinary. I selected the chicken and waffles, a dish considered to be so much a signature that it's written in the front window.

Ameca interior

It's been just over a year since my trip to Mexico City and I believe I've just had the most authentic Mexican food since then. It was at a little place called Taqueria Ameca.

This is a small, barebones operation in a cramped strip mall south of downtown. (It's in the same location as the recently reviewed Flavors Nigerian.) On my recent visit the restaurant was doing a brisk lunch business, and I was encouraged to realize that I was the only non-Hispanic among them.

There is no printed menu, as far as I can tell. The selections are inartistically written on a white board near the ordering counter. There aren't even headings — the tacos are listed with the various filling options with enchiladas, sopes and other items mixed in.

Umi ramen

I thoroughly enjoyed my visit to Umi, the latest sushi bar and Japanese restaurant to occupy a familiar Park Avenue Space, even though it included some of the absolute worst mussels to ever have been placed in front of me.

Umi is at the "bottom" of Park Avenue, at 525 South, where various other sushi and Japanese restaurants — plus an occasional bit of Thai — have called home. Most recently it was Avenue Thai & Sushi. Its longest and most familiar occupant was Shiki.

Umi has an austere yet pleasant vibe. The menu features not only the expected sushi selections but also kitchen foods that include robata grilled meats and a couple of ramen soups.